Random IP Generator - Create Random Internet Addresses ...

A slightly overboard response to my threat model.

For what I hope are obvious reasons, I don't want, and probably will never post my threat model publicly online. However, regardless of that, what I'm sure you will extrapolate from this post is that I live my life, digitally in particular, with a fairly high level threat model. This is not because I'm some super sophisticated criminal mastermind, but rather, I am at this level because I genuinely love playing around with this stuff. And I just happen to understand the importance of privacy and just how vital it is to a truly healthy society. I would like to extend a thanks to ProgressiveArchitect for the sharing of the knowledge they have done on this subreddit, /privacytoolsio, and the like. We may have never interacted, but nevertheless, your input into this community is truly interesting and extremely informative and educating. I'm sure those of you familiar with PA's setup will be able to draw some parallels with mine and their's.
Thank you.
I hope you all enjoy reading this write up.
I run Qubes OS on a Lenovo ThinkPad X230 laptop. Specs for it are as following: - i7-3520M - 16GB RAM - 1TB Samsung 860 Evo SSD - Qualcomm Atheros AR9285 wireless card
Additionally, I used a Raspberry Pi Model 3B+ and a Pomono SPI clip to replace the stock BIOS firmware with coreboot+me_cleaner. This wasn't done out of any "real" concern for the Intel ME (though of course proprietary black-boxes like it should be avoided at all costs and not trusted), but rather for open source enthusiasm and for increased security and faster boot times than what the stock BIOS firmware allows for. On that note about the ME, I don't believe the conspiracy theories that claim that it is a state-sponsored attack method for surveillance. I believe that Intel had good intentions for improving the lives of IT professionals who need to manage hundreds, if not thousands of remote machines. However, it has proven time and time again to be insecure, and I don't need the remote management and the "features" that it provides on my machines.
In Qubes, I use a combination of AppVMs and StandaloneVMs for a variety of different purposes. All VMs use PVH over HVM, except for the Mirage Unikernel Firewall, which uses PV, and the sys-net and sys-usb StandaloneVMs which have to use HVM because of PCI device passthrough. Right now most of my VMs are AppVMs, but for maintenance and compartmentalization reasons, I am considering moving more towards StandaloneVMs, despite the increase in disk space and bandwidth usage for updates.
General route of from Qubes to the Internet for anonymous browsing, general private browsing, accessing Uni services, and Uni-related anonymous browsing respectively: 1. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->sys-vpn-wg->sys-corridor->sys-whonix->whonix-ws-15-dvm to the internet. 2. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->sys-vpn-wg to the Internet. 3. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->uni-vpn-wg to the Internet. 4. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->uni-vpn-wg->uni-corridor->uni-whonix->uni-anon-research to the Internet.

(Note: the VPN name is substituted in the "vpn" above. I had to remove it to comply with this subreddit's rules. It is easy to identify what VPN it is as it randomly generates a long numaric string and has fantastic support for WireGuard.)

Web Browsers: - Tor Browser (primary) in a disposable Whonix VM. - Firefox (secondary) with the about:config changes listed on privacytools.io and the following extensions: Cookies AutoDelete, Decentraleyes, HTTPS Everywhere, uBlock Origin (advance user, all third party content blocked and JavaScript disabled), and Vim Vixen. Used in my personal AppVM. - Ungoogled Chromium (Uni only) with standard uBlock Origin and cVim. Used only for Uni-related access in my uni-campus and uni-home AppVMs.
Search Engine: SearX, Startpage, and DuckDuckGo.
Password Manager: KeePassXC.
Office: LibreOffice.
Notes: Standard Notes.
Messaging: Signal Desktop.
Media Playback: mpv.
Emails: I access my personal email within my personal Qubes domain and my Uni email using my Uni Qubes domains. My emails are downloaded to a local repository using isync, send using msmtp, and read using neomutt with html emails converted to plain text using w3m. Emails are sent in plain text too. All of the attachments in the emails (PDFs mostly) are automatically opened in DisposableVMs.
My personal Posteo email account has incoming encryption setup. This means that I emailed my public GPG key to an address correlated to my actual Posteo email address so that all email that I receive is encrypted with my public key and can only be decrypted using my private key. So even if my emails were intercepted and/or my account broken into, the contents of them are safe since they are encrypted as soon as they hit Posteo's servers.
I have setup a number of Posteo aliases that are completely segregated from the email I used to register my account. One of those is considered my "professional" email for my current job. I have another couple aliases, one dedicated for 33mail and another dedicated for Abine Blur. I make use of 33mail alias addresses for catch-all email addresses for registering for accounts that need to be under a username associated with my name anyways. This is for purposes like putting different compartmentalized, but still related emails to put onto my Resume. I use a different alias for each Resume I put out online. That way, when that information gets sold, traded, etc., I can easily trace it back to who sold the information. For example, if I applied for a job online that required me to go through the process of registering an account through a third-party, say 'xyz Inc', the address I would register that account with would be [email protected], or something along those lines. Abine Blur is used much in the same manner but for accounts that don't need to be associated with my real name in any way, say online shopping on Amazon that I do under an many aliases, then ship to various address that I don't live at, but that I can visit with no problems. I use a different Blur address with each service like with 33mail for the same reasoning shown above.
The passwords for the accounts are encrypted and stored locally in each of the domains, however, my private key is stored in my vault domain, so even if an adversary were to compromise the domains, they wouldn't be able to steal my private key without exploiting the hypervisor. They would only be able to wait for me to authorize the usage of my private key in that domain, and even then, it could only be used to decrypt files. That is a concern that they can use my private key to decrypt messages, but they wouldn't be able to steal the key. With my personal email, the emails would also be encrypted locally anyway so they wouldn't be able to read them. My Uni email, in contrast, uses Outlook unfortunately, so there isn't any option to enable incoming encryption, and even if it was, I'm not sure how private it would be anyways.
For those looking for an in depth list of all my VMs, with explanations for the more obscure ones, I have listed them below. I have got a lot of templates, hence why I am considering moving over to StandaloneVMs, but as of right now:

Templates:

StandaloneVMs:

AppVMs:

Phone: Motorola Moto G5s running Lineage OS 16.0 Pie no G-Apps or micro-G with the following Apps: - AdAway: Open Source hosts file-based ad blocker. (Requires root.) - AFWall+: Linux iptables front end. (Requires root.) - Amaze: File manager. - andOPT: 2FA app. I like it since it can export the entries to an AES encrypted file. - AntennaPod: Podcast manager. - AnySoftKeyboard - Simple Calendar - Simple Contacts Pro - DAVx5: CalDav syncronization with my calendar on my Posteo email account. - F-Droid - Fennec F-Droid: Web Browser. Has the same Firefox addons like on Qubes minus Vim Vixen. I used the app Privacy Settings to configure the about:config. - KeePassDX: Password manager. - KISS launcher - Magisk Manager - NewPipe: YouTube app replacement. - S.Notes: Standard Notes. - OsmAnd~: Maps and navigation. - Red Moon: Blue light filter. - SELinuxModeChanger: Exactly as it sounds. (Requires root.) - Shelter: Work profile manager. - Signal: Messaging. - Vinyl Music Player: Music player. - WireGuard: VPN protocol frontend. Is configured to use my VPN account. Is setup as an always-on and connected VPN.
As mentioned, I use Shelter to manage my work profile. In it I isolate the following apps: - Clover: *chan browser. - Orbot: For routing apps through Tor. Is setup as an always-on and connected VPN. - RedReader: Reddit client. - Tor Browser
Over the last several years, I have started using my phone less and less and taking advantage of less of what it has got to offer. I don't check email on my device. I have no real need to browse the Internet on it outside of watching videos using NewPipe, browsing Reddit, and various *chan boards.
On the Smart Phone side of things, I am considering purchasing an older used iPhone SE or 6S for use with MySudo when outside of my home as well as an iPod Touch for use on WiFi only for use inside my home. The iPhone would be kept inside of a faraday bag when I am at home and not using it. It would also be kept in the faraday bag whenever at home to avoid associating that device with my home address. The iPod Touch would be used for MySudo calls instead.
Future outlook and plan for my privacy and security:
To avoid as much deanonymisation of my privacy as possible, I'm only going to specify enough so that anyone reading this can get the jist of my situation in life. I am quite young (age 16 to 25) and I started along this privacy journey when I was even younger. I was never a very heavy social media user, however I did have an online presence if you looked hard enough. My name fortunately is a very common and short name, so that does help to bury information that I was not able to remove further in the vast trenches that is the Internet.
On the digital side of things, I mentioned that I have a dedicated Crypto AppVM for handling crypto currency transactions using Bisq. I have setup a dedicated bank account that I have periodically been transferring money into so that I can trade crypto. Unfortunately, I do not live in the US, so being able to effectively start trades with others is more difficult. I also do not have access to a credit card masking account like privacy.com (that I absolutely would use given the ability). I plan on getting an anonymous VPS to host my own Tor exit node for better speeds and to mitigate the possibility of malicious exit nodes. The country I live in has been a proponent of absolute dragnet surveillance on all activities occurring online and in real life, though the former is far more visible on this subreddit. I will be using crypto with cleaned Bitcoin (as seen with ProgressiveArchitect's setup) for purchasing my VPN service, etc.
With future hardware, to replace my aging laptop, I am very hopeful for Xen, then eventually Qubes OS getting ported to Power9. When that happens I'll be getting a Raptor Computing Blackbird as a desktop. Maybe in the future I'll get a Purism Librem laptop, but for now my corebooted X230 works perfectly for my use cases. On that note, I have successfully build the Heads firmware for the X230 and I was able to get the minimal 4MB image flashed on my laptop. I did revert it back to my coreboot setup after playing around a little with it, and unfortunately I haven't had time since to do a full, complete flash of it.
On the physical/real life side of things, I plan on making use of various Trusts in order to hold assets, say to keep my name from being immediately visible on the title of my car. As of right now I am fortunate enough to have the title of my car under the name of someone who I trust. Unless I am legally required, and where there are immediate and absolute consequences, I use fake names in real life. With Uni, I am enrolled under my real name and address. This is a requirement and it is verified, so there is nothing that I can realistically do about it. As for other services, I plan on setting up a personal mailbox (PMB), etc if possible to use as a real, physical address that is associated with my real name and that is used for things like Government issued ID. In the future when I move again, I plan on renting a place in cash to try and keep my name dissociated with my real address. For those looking for reasoning on why one would want to do that, please read How to be Invisible by J.J. Luna. It's truly the Bible of physical privacy.
At this stage I am just going off on a ramble, so I should cut it short here.
I have just started and I live for this shit.
submitted by ComprehensiveAddict to privacy [link] [comments]

First home server; will my plan accomplish my goals?

I'm planning to build my first home server, and I'd love some feedback on my plans before I buy all the hardware. Can you folks help me with some feedback?
 
What I Want to Do with My Hardware
 
Constraints
 
Current Plan
 
Currently Planned Hardware
Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Xeon E5-2660 V2 2.2 GHz 10-Core Processor $192.97 @ PCM
CPU Intel - Xeon E5-2660 V2 2.2 GHz 10-Core Processor $192.97 @ PCM
CPU Cooler Noctua - NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler $89.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Noctua - NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler $89.99 @ Amazon
Thermal Compound Thermal Grizzly - Aeronaut 3.9 g Thermal Paste $11.59 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - EP2C602-4L/D16 SSI EEB Dual-CPU LGA2011 Motherboard $481.98 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial - 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) Registered DDR3-1866 Memory $159.99 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital - Blue 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $114.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Western Digital - Blue 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $114.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Storage Western Digital - Red Pro 8 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $140.00
Video Card Asus - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6 GB Strix Video Card $359.98 @ B&H
Case Phanteks - Enthoo Pro Tempered Glass ATX Full Tower Case $122.00 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - HX Platinum 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Newegg
Sound Card Creative Labs - Sound Blaster Z 30SB150200000 OEM 24-bit 192 kHz Sound Card $90.77 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $3002.00
Mail-in rebates -$40.00
Total $2962.00
 
Hardware Notes
 
Budget
 
Other Notes
 
My main question is: will this hardware and software setup accomplish my goals?
My secondary question is: is any of my hardware unnecessary for my goals? are there better ways to eat this Reese's?
Thanks so much for all the help in advance, I've learned so much from this subreddit (and DataHoarding) already!
submitted by therightrook to homelab [link] [comments]

A tour of the Gridcoin wallet

Hey guys, I thought I would put together an in-depth tour of the Gridcoin wallet software for all of our recent newcomers. Here I'll be outlining all the features and functions the windows GUI wallet has to offer, along with some basic RPC command usage. I'll be using the windows wallet as an example, but both linux and macOS should be rather similar. I'll be including as many pictures as I can as embedded hyperlinks.
Edit: Note that since I originally made this there has been a UI update, so your client will be different colors but all the button locations are in the same place.
This is my first post like this, so please forgive me if this appears a little scatter-brained.
This will not cover the mining setup process for pool or solo miners.
When you launch the wallet software for the first time you should be greeted with this screen.

OVERVIEW TAB

After that prompt, you should be left sitting on the main overview tab with several fields on it.
From top to bottom:

SEND TAB

Now onto the other tabs on the left side. Currently we're on the Overview tab, lets move down to the Send tab. This tab it pretty self-explanatory, you use it if you want to send coins, but I'll go over the fields here:
  • Pay To: Enter a valid gridcoin address to send coins too. Gridcoin addresses always start with an S or and R.
  • Label: Enter a label here and it will put that address in your "address book" under that label for later use. You can leave it blank if you don't want it in your address book.
  • Message: Enter a message here if you want it attached to your transaction.
  • Amount: How many coins you want to send.
  • Add Attachment: Leave this alone, it is broken.
  • Track Coins: This doesn't do anything.

RECEIVE TAB

Now down to the Receive tab. Here you should have a single address listed. If you double click on the label field, you can edit it's label.
  • New: Generate a new address.
If you click on an address, the rest of the options should be clickable.
  • Copy: Copy the selected address to your clipboard.
  • Show QR Code: Show a scan-able QR code for the selected address.
  • Sign Message: Cryptographically sign a message using the selected address.

TRANSACTIONS TAB

The Transactions tab is pretty boring considering we have no transactions yet. But as you can see there are some sorting tools at the top for when you do have transactions listed.

ADDRESS BOOK TAB

The Address Book is where all the addresses you've labeled (that aren't yours) will show up.
  • Verify Message: Verifies a message was signed by the selected address.
The rest of the functions are similar to the functions on the Receive tab.

VOTING TAB

Onto the Voting tab. There wont be any polls because we aren't in sync yet.
  • Reload Polls: Pretty self-explanatory, I've never had to use this.
  • Load History: By default, the wallet will only display active polls. If you want to view past polls you can use this.
  • Create Poll: You can create a network-wide poll. You must have 100,000 coins as a requirement to make a poll. (Creating a poll does not consume the coins)
Here's what the Voting tab will look like once you're in sync

CONTEXT BAR

Now onto the context bar menus on the top.
Under File you have:
  • Backup Wallet/Config: This lets you backup your wallet configuration file just in case.
  • Export: You can export your Transactions tab or Address Book in CSV format.
  • Sign message: Does the same thing as on the Receive tab.
  • Verify message: Does the same thing as on the Address Book tab.
  • Exit: Close the wallet.
Under Settings you have:
  • Encrypt Wallet: Encrypts your wallet with a password. (we'll come back to this)
  • Change Passphrase: Allows you to change your encryption password.
  • Options: Opens the options menu. (We'll come back to this)
Under Community you have:
Under Advanced you have:
  • Advanced Configuration: Opens the Advanced Configuration menu. (Not so advanced if you ask me)
  • Neural Network: Allows you to view solo miners project statistics. It will be largely blank if you're not in sync yet.
  • FAQ: Don't touch this, It is broken.
  • Foundation: Don't touch this, It is broken.
  • Rebuild Block Chain: Starts the client syncing from 0. Don't worry, using this will not make you lose coins.
  • Download Blocks: Downloads the latest official snapshot, can help speed up syncing. The download progress tends to sit at 99.99% for a long time, don't worry, it's working.
Under Help you have:
  • Debug window: Opens the debug window. (We'll come back to this)
  • Diagnostics: Don't touch this, it is broken. This has since been fixed. You can use this to see if there is anything wrong with your setup.
  • About Gridcoin: Opens the About Dialog. This gives you your client version and other information.

OPTIONS

Now back to the options menu under Settings > Options.
Here we have the options menu main tab:
  • Pay transaction fee: The transaction fee that will be automatically paid when you make a transaction.
  • Reserve: You can reserve an amount so that it will always be available for spending.
  • Start Gridcoin on system login: Pretty self-explanatory
  • Detach databases at shutdown: Speeds up shutdown, but causes your blockchain file to no longer be portable.
On the Network tab:
  • Map port using UPnP: Attempts to connect to nodes through UPnP.
  • Connect through SOCKS proxy: Allows you to connect through a proxy.
The window tab is pretty self-explanatory.
The Display tab is also pretty self-explanatory, with the exception of:
  • Display coin control features (experts only!): This allows you to have a great deal of control over the coins in your wallet, check this for now and I'll explain how to use it further down. Don't forget to click "Apply".

ENCRYPTING YOUR WALLET

Now that all of that is out of the way. The first thing you'll want to do is encrypt your wallet. This prevents anybody with access to your computer from sending coins. This is something I would recommend everyone do.
Go to Settings > Encrypt Wallet and create a password. YOU CANNOT RECOVER YOUR COINS IF YOU FORGET YOUR PASSWORD.
Your wallet will close and you will have to start it up again. This time when it opens up, you should have a new button in the bottom left. Now if you want to stake you will have to unlock your wallet. Notice the "For staking only" box that is checked by default. If you want to send a beacon for solo mining or vote, you will need to uncheck this box.

GETTING IN SYNC AND ICONS

Before we continue, Let's wait until we're in sync. Depending on your internet speeds, this could take from several hours to over a day or 2. This can be sped up by using Advanced > Download Blocks, but this can still take several hours.
This is what an in-sync client should look like. Notice the green check to the right of the Receive tab. All of these icons give you information when you hover your mouse over them.
The lock
The arrow tells you if you're staking. If you aren't staking, it will tell you why you're not staking. If you are staking it will give you an estimated staking time. Staking is a very random process and this is only an estimate, not a countdown.
The connection bars tell you how many connections to the network you have.
The check tells you if you're in sync.

WHAT IS STAKING?

Now I've said "stake" about a million times so far and haven't explained it. Gridcoin is a Proof of Stake (PoS) coin.
Unlike bitcoins Proof of Work (PoW), PoS uses little system resources, so you can use those resources for scientific work. PoS works by users "Staking" with their balance. The higher the balance, the higher the chance to create, or "stake" a block. This means you need to have a positive balance in order to stake. Theoretically, you can stake with any amount over 0.0125 coins, but in practice it's recommended to have at least 2000 coins to reliably stake.
Staking is important for solo miners, because they get paid when they stake. Pool miners don't need to stake in order to get paid however. So if you want to solo mine, you'll need to buy some coins from an exchange or start in the pool first and move to solo when you have enough coins.
In addition to Research Rewards for miners, anyone who holds coins (solo miners, pool miners, and investors) gets 1.5% interest annually on top of your coins. So it can be beneficial for pool miners to stake as well.
Here is a snippet of what a research rewards transaction looks like from my personal wallet. I have a label on that address of "Payout address" as you can see here.

UTXOS AND COIN CONTROL

At this point you'll need some coins. You can use one of our faucets like this one or this one to test coin control out.
First let me explain what a UTXO is. UTXO stands for Unspent Transaction Output. Say you have an address with 0 coins in it, and someone sends you 10 coins like I've done here. Those 10 coins are added to that address in the form of a UTXO, so we have an address with one 10 coin UTXO in it.
Now we receive another 5 coins at the same address, like so. Now we have an address with one 10 coin UTXO and one 5 coin UTXO. But how do we view how our addresses are split up into different UTXOs?
Earlier we checked the "Display coin control features" box in Settings > Options > Display. Once that's checked you'll notice there's another section in the Send tab labeled "Coin Control Features". If you click the "Inputs" button, you'll get a new window. And look, there's our 2 UTXOs.
All UTXOs try to stake separately from each other, and remember that the chance a UTXO has to stake is proportional to it's size. So in this situation, my 10 coin UTXO has twice the chance to stake as my 5 coin UTXO. Now wallets, especially ones that make a lot of transactions, can get very fragmented over time. I've fragmented my wallet a little so I can show you what I'm talking about.
How do we clean this up? We can consolidate all this into one UTXO by checking all the boxes on the left and selecting OK.
Now pay attention to the fields on the top:
  • Quantity: The total amount of UTXOs we have selected.
  • Amount: The total amount of coins we have selected.
  • Fee: How much it would cost in fees to send all those UTXOs (more UTXOs = more transaction data = more fees)
  • After Fee: Amount - Fees.
  • Bytes: How large the transaction is in bytes.
  • Priority: How your client would prioritize making a transaction with this specific set of UTXOs selected had you not used coin control.
  • Low Output: If your transaction is less than 0.01 coins (I think).
  • Change: What you will get back in change.
  • custom change address: You can set the address you get your change back at, by default it will generate a new address.
So let's fill out our transaction so we end up with 1 UTXO at the end.
In "Pay To:" Just put any address in your wallet, and for the amount put what it has listed in the "After Fee" Field. Just like this.
Notice how we get no change back.
Now click "Send", we'll be prompted to enter our passphrase and we're asked if we want to pay the fee, go ahead and click "Yes".
Now if we go back to the Overview tab we get this funky icon. If you hover your mouse over it, it says "Payment to yourself", and the -0.0002 GRC is the network transaction fee.
(Ignore the first one, that was me fragmenting my wallet)
Now if we look at the Coin Control menu, we can see that we've slimmed our wallet down from 7 UTXOs to 1.
Now why would you want to use coin control?
2 Situations:
  1. UTXOs less than 0.0125 coins cannot stake. So you can combine a lot of tiny, useless UTXOs into 1 bigger one that can stake.
  2. After a UTXO stakes, it cannot stake for another 16 hours. So if you have 1 large UTXO that is big enough to stake more than once every 16 hours, you can split it into smaller UTXOs which can allow you to stake slightly more often.
  3. By default, the wallet will always generate a new address for change, which can make your wallet get very messy if you're sending lots of transactions. Keep in mind that more UTXOs = larger transactions = more fees.
Sidenote - When you stake, you will earn all research rewards owed reguardless of which UTXO staked. However, you'll earn the 1.5% interest for that UTXO. Not your whole wallet.

FORKING

A fork is when the network splits into multiple chains, with part of the network on each chain. A fork can happen when 2 blocks are staked by different clients at the same time or very close to the same time, or when your client rejects a block that should have been accepted due to a bug in the code or through some other unique circumstance.
How do I know if I'm on a fork?
Generally you can spot a fork by looking at the difficulty on your Overview tab. With current network conditions, if your difficulty is below 0.1, then you're probably on a fork.
You can confirm this by comparing your blockhash with someone elses, like a block explorer.
Go to [Help > Debug Window > Console]. This is the RPC console, we can use to do a lot of things. You can type help to get a list of commands, and you can type help [command you need help with] (without the brackets) to get information on a command. We'll be using the getblockhash [block number] command.
Type getblockhash [block number] in the console, but replace [block number] with the number listed next to the "Blocks:" field on the Overview tab.
This will spit out a crazy string of characters, this is the "blockhash" of that block.
Now head over to your favorite block explorer, I'll be using gridcoinstats. Find the block that you have the hash for, use the search bar or just find it in the list of blocks.
Now compare your hash with the one gridcoinstats gives you. Does it match?
If it matches, then you're probably good to go. If it matches but you still think you're on a fork, then you can try other block explorers, such as gridcoin.network or neuralminer.io.
If it doesn't match, then you need to try to get off that fork.
How do I get off a fork?
  1. Just wait for an hour or two. 95% of the time your client is able to recover itself from a fork given a little time.
  2. Restart the client, wait a few minutes to see if it fixes itself. If it doesn't restart again and wait. Repeat about 4 or 5 times.
  3. Find where the fork started. Using the getblockhash command, go back some blocks and compare hashes with that on a block explorer so you can narrow down what the last block you and the block explorer had in common. Then use reorganize [the last block hash you had in common]. Note that reorganize takes a blockhash, not a block number.
  4. Use Advanced > Download Blocks.
  5. If none of this works, you can take a look at social media (reddit/steemit) and see what other people are saying.

CONFIGURATION FILE

Your configuration file depends on your operation system:
  • On Windows: %appdata%\GridcoinResearch\
  • On Linux: ~/.GridcoinResearch/
  • On MacOS: /Users/USERNAME/Library/Application/Support/GridcoinResearch/
And it should look like this.
If you open up your gridcoinresearch.conf, you'll see the default one it generated. Note that if you entered your email earlier, the first line will have your email on it instead of "investor". If you decided you want to solo mine but didn't enter your email when you first started the wallet, go ahead and put your email on the first line in place of "investor". If you're a pool miner, just leave it as "investor".
Next, it's recommended that you use the addnodes on the gridcoin wiki. So our gridcoinresearch.conf will look like this.
A useful line for solo miners is PrimaryCPID=[YOUR CPID]. Sometimes your wallet can pick up on the wrong CPID so it's good to have that in there if you're solo mining.

RUNNING A LISTENING NODE

A listening node is a node that listens for blocks and transactions broadcasted from nodes and forwards them on to other nodes. For example, during the syncing process when you're getting your node running for the first time, you're downloading all the blocks from listening nodes. So running a listening node helps support the network.
Running a gridcoin listening node is simple. All you need to do is add listen=1 to your gridcoinresearch.conf and you need to forward port 32749 on your router.
If you don't know how to port forward, I'd suggest googling "How to port forward [your router manufacturer]".

QUICK LINKS

Gridcoin.us Official Website
Gridcoin.science Unofficial Website
Gridcoinstats.eu Block Explorer
NeuralMiner.io Block Explorer
Gridcoinstats.eu Faucet
Gridcoin.ch Faucet
Gridcoin Wiki
Gridcoin Github
GRCPool
Arikado Pool
And that's all I have for now!
I plan to keep this post up-to-date with changes in the client. So if anyone has any suggestions, have clarifications they want made, or maybe I got something wrong, then please feel free to leave a comment below or PM me!
submitted by Personthingman2 to gridcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: pihole top posts from 2016-01-21 to 2018-04-11 12:37 PDT

Period: 811.12 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 15217
Rate (per day) 1.23 18.77
Unique Redditors 741 3059
Combined Score 29657 43946

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 3478 points, 36 submissions: Pi-hole
    1. Pi-hole™ 3.0 Is Here Featuring Our New FTL Engine (257 points, 96 comments)
    2. Coming Soon: FTLDNS™ Pi-hole’s Own DNS/DHCP server (235 points, 89 comments)
    3. Pi-hole v3.2.1 Released With Lots Of Fixes (224 points, 74 comments)
    4. Pi-hole v3.2 Introduces Long-term Statistics, An Audit Log, Colours, and More! (212 points, 190 comments)
    5. 5,000 GitHub Stars And 10,000 Redditors: Thank You! (210 points, 8 comments)
    6. Pi-hole Web Interface: The Next Generation (192 points, 42 comments)
    7. Pi-hole v3.3 Released: It’s “Extra” Special (156 points, 202 comments)
    8. Pi-hole v3.1 Has Been Released (153 points, 51 comments)
    9. A Security Reminder When Installing Pi-hole (141 points, 9 comments)
    10. Why Some Pages Load Slow When Using Pi-hole And How To Fix It (139 points, 35 comments)
  2. 855 points, 23 submissions: -PromoFaux-
    1. Pi-hole 2.10 and Web Admin 2.0 released with lots of bugfixes and new goodies! (116 points, 157 comments)
    2. Pi-hole Core 2.12 and Pi-hole Web Admin 2.4 Released! (103 points, 60 comments)
    3. Pi-hole Core 2.13 and Pi-hole Web Admin 2.5 Released! (87 points, 52 comments)
    4. Pi-hole Core 2.11 and Pi-hole Web Admin 2.3 released (71 points, 131 comments)
    5. Pi-hole 2.9.5 Released With Fixes And Two New Features (62 points, 46 comments)
    6. Pi-hole 2.10.1 and Web Admin 2.0.1 released with bug fixes! (49 points, 59 comments)
    7. Pi-hole 2.9 Released With Important Bug Fixes Plus Some Cool New Stuff (39 points, 46 comments)
    8. For those interested.. we have a new logo! (30 points, 6 comments)
    9. Introducing a central place to discuss Pi-hole (30 points, 7 comments)
    10. Pi-hole v2.6 out now! (27 points, 39 comments)
  3. 542 points, 3 submissions: itsmesid
    1. Simple speedtest added to Pihole Web UI , Takes tests every hour . (349 points, 132 comments)
    2. Regular Speedtest Mod on Pi-hole , Here is tutorial on how to get it . (170 points, 90 comments)
    3. Pi-hole Speedtest Mod Update instructions (23 points, 31 comments)
  4. 447 points, 3 submissions: super_nicktendo22
    1. PiHole setup went so well at home for the 1st month, I've installed the same at work now. (240 points, 65 comments)
    2. Thanks for giving my old Pi 2B a reason to boot in the morning (128 points, 14 comments)
    3. My Internet connection went down this afternoon, and PiHole captured Teamviewer (on the Pi) going absolutely berserk attempting to reconnect (79 points, 4 comments)
  5. 386 points, 3 submissions: rj45jack
    1. STOP exposing your Pi-Hole to the Internet! (232 points, 78 comments)
    2. I made a quick video to help people setup Pi-Hole for the first time. (Also got awesome stickers from the Pi-Hole guys) (102 points, 25 comments)
    3. PSA: Default block lists now blocking some Crypto-Mining Pools (52 points, 13 comments)
  6. 379 points, 1 submission: Cant-Ban-Me
    1. 24 Hours Ago, I Didn't Know What PiHole Was. Now I'm Ad Free! Thank you! (379 points, 43 comments)
  7. 349 points, 7 submissions: agb-101
    1. Microsoft-provided list of URLs and their associated function, and the consequences of blocking. (146 points, 18 comments)
    2. Has anyone tried 1.1.1.1 with pihole yet? (cloudflare's DNS via HTTPS) (125 points, 95 comments)
    3. What is everyone wildcard-blacklisting? (26 points, 18 comments)
    4. How does Pi-hole treat HTTPS ads? (22 points, 3 comments)
    5. Getting pihole to play nicely with Pfsense? (12 points, 28 comments)
    6. Authoritative Coinhive / Monero / similar lists? (9 points, 2 comments)
    7. Drive-by cryptomining campaign targets millions of Android users - Malwarebytes Labs (9 points, 0 comments)
  8. 341 points, 2 submissions: BAKACHEWYCHOMP
    1. Everything on TMZ.com is blocked by PiHole. Sounds about right. (207 points, 4 comments)
    2. My PiHole setup after browsing this subreddit for the past few days (134 points, 32 comments)
  9. 303 points, 8 submissions: rediii123
    1. We should create a Bitcoin-Mining-Blocklist (79 points, 19 comments)
    2. Make the pi-holed site more friendly like block page from WaLLy3K (see link) (77 points, 10 comments)
    3. Login manager autofill abuse anti-tracking list (48 points, 9 comments)
    4. Your Pi-Hole lists (34 points, 37 comments)
    5. Add piholeparser to PiHole ? (22 points, 6 comments)
    6. Domains for blocking nVidia Tracking (21 points, 5 comments)
    7. Whitelists doesnt work (12 points, 5 comments)
    8. Load filterlists only over HTTPS & check HTTPS certs (10 points, 8 comments)
  10. 235 points, 3 submissions: C0LT0GRAPHY
    1. Get to see how many ads I've blocked any time I look in the mirror now! (129 points, 19 comments)
    2. Strapped my Pihole to the side of my router. (89 points, 29 comments)
    3. Anyone here with a Vizio TV? My Vizio TV tried to connect to images.vizio.com 4700+ times today. (17 points, 7 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. WaLLy3K (1828 points, 396 comments)
  2. -PromoFaux- (1748 points, 507 comments)
  3. AtariDump (1320 points, 394 comments)
  4. Mcat12 (888 points, 369 comments)
  5. gaso (767 points, 282 comments)
  6. clickwir (684 points, 177 comments)
  7. dschaper (622 points, 220 comments)
  8. telekrmor (560 points, 139 comments)
  9. TechnicalPyro (406 points, 159 comments)
  10. 0110010001100010 (315 points, 60 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. 24 Hours Ago, I Didn't Know What PiHole Was. Now I'm Ad Free! Thank you! by Cant-Ban-Me (379 points, 43 comments)
  2. Simple speedtest added to Pihole Web UI , Takes tests every hour . by itsmesid (349 points, 132 comments)
  3. Pi-hole™ 3.0 Is Here Featuring Our New FTL Engine by Pi-hole (257 points, 96 comments)
  4. PiHole setup went so well at home for the 1st month, I've installed the same at work now. by super_nicktendo22 (240 points, 65 comments)
  5. Coming Soon: FTLDNS™ Pi-hole’s Own DNS/DHCP server by Pi-hole (235 points, 89 comments)
  6. STOP exposing your Pi-Hole to the Internet! by rj45jack (232 points, 78 comments)
  7. Pi-hole v3.2.1 Released With Lots Of Fixes by Pi-hole (224 points, 74 comments)
  8. [PSA] If you're not using Facebook: blacklist it. by GroceryBagHead (215 points, 26 comments)
  9. Pi-hole v3.2 Introduces Long-term Statistics, An Audit Log, Colours, and More! by Pi-hole (212 points, 190 comments)
  10. 5,000 GitHub Stars And 10,000 Redditors: Thank You! by Pi-hole (210 points, 8 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 170 points: Winck's comment in My admin inerface is chinese and pihole doesnt work anymore. Was I hacked or somehting?
  2. 143 points: duhblow7's comment in Holy s**t... This pi-hole thing is accessing gov't blocked websites. No proxy, no VPN.
  3. 135 points: -PromoFaux-'s comment in Simple speedtest added to Pihole Web UI , Takes tests every hour .
  4. 132 points: clickwir's comment in 24 Hours Ago, I Didn't Know What PiHole Was. Now I'm Ad Free! Thank you!
  5. 96 points: CompPlayersRuinedTF2's comment in Ran 1 Malwarebytes scan on my PC...
  6. 78 points: omegahack's comment in Pi-hole v3.2.1 Released With Lots Of Fixes
  7. 74 points: PovertyPanda's comment in Coming Soon: FTLDNS™ Pi-hole’s Own DNS/DHCP server
  8. 73 points: chunkyks's comment in Pi-hole User Survey
  9. 60 points: AtariDump's comment in What you get when you buy a cheap Chinese IP Camera
  10. 59 points: ToNIX_'s comment in 24 Hours Ago, I Didn't Know What PiHole Was. Now I'm Ad Free! Thank you!
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

AntRouter R3-LTC, a WiFi Router and Clock That Mines Too Mining Worldcoin with Multiminer Antminer R1 miner, wifi router Bitmain Antminer S5 Setup Video Steps by steps [ CPU Mining any Cryptocurrency ] 2017

I have a very restrictive firewall with an additional proxy here. Is there a GPU mining tool out there that supports proxy server? The best would be a SSL connection to the mining pool. A long living stream also doesn't work I think, because Internet radio is not possible. I don't have a PC on the outside, so SSH tunnel is no option. Useful, free online tool that generates random Internet Protocol addresses. No ads, nonsense or garbage, just a random IP generator. Press button, get result. CoinWarz – Provides cryptocurrency mining profitability comparisons versus Bitcoin mining. What Is My Hash Rate – A tool that you can use to determine your device’s CPU hash rate to figure out how profitable you will be at CPU mining. From their site: What Is My Hash Rate is a reference site to view your computer’s hash rate. Hash rate refers to how fast your computer (CPU) can compute ... BFGMiner a modular ASIC/FPGA Bitcoin miner Last version: 5.5.0 Windows 32bit - Windows 64bit Arch: pacman -S bfgminer Debian: aptitude install bfgminer Gentoo: emerge bfgminer OpenWrt: opkg repository Ubuntu: apt-get install bfgminer Source code I have an old Linksys wrtg54g router for wifi. Will I bottleneck if I switch my setup to communicate to the internet through wifi? I'm mining on Bitminter. Will I start to get a bunch of stale proofs? 8 comments. share. save hide report. 76% Upvoted. This thread is archived. New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast. Sort by. best. level 1. 6 points · 6 years ago. Mining uses ...

[index] [51393] [23293] [45481] [40476] [46048] [1757] [32369] [40481] [11778] [26513]

AntRouter R3-LTC, a WiFi Router and Clock That Mines Too

How To Connect Two Routers On One Home Network Using A Lan Cable Stock Router Netgear/TP-Link ... How to start Bitcoin mining for beginners (SUPER EASY) - ULTIMATE GUIDE - Duration: 13:51. We Do ... How To Connect Two Routers On One Home Network Using A Lan Cable Stock Router Netgear/TP-Link - Duration: 33:19. Richard Lloyd Recommended for you Easiest way to mine Bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies with laptop. Click here to register on MinerGate: https://minergate.com/a/69306d2babcd442ed23df5f9 Cl... download link::::https://goo.gl/dwcQW2 how to buy usb bitcoin miner ::: https://youtu.be/f4MGJPhyRbQ website ::http://universelmoneyadder.blogspot.in/p/blog-... *** All hardware in this video is provided for test by http://www.AsicExport.com *** Review of Antminer r1 wifi router with solo bitcoin mining.

#